The Good And The Bad Aspects Of Filing For Personal Bankruptcy

Many debtors have the common misconception that filing for personal bankruptcy is the worst thing that they can do to their credit score. This is not the case. Your score will be substantially lower, if you continue to juggle payments that you cannot afford. The late payments on multiple accounts will cause more damage than bankruptcy. Read on for more tips concerning bankruptcy.

One you realize you are in financial trouble and have decided to file for personal bankruptcy you should move quickly. Waiting to the last minute to file bankruptcy can cause a number of issues. You may face negative repercussions such as wage or bank account garnishment or foreclosure on your home. You can also not leave time enough for a thorough review of your financial situation, which will limit your available options.

Don’t be afraid to apply for credit for purchases such as a new home or car just because you have a recently discharged bankruptcy. Many lenders will take your new financial situation into account. They may be more likely to loan money to someone who has no debt due to a bankruptcy than to the person with, say, 75,000 dollars in credit card debt. The fact that you have no monthly credit card payments can make you look like a better risk.

Remember you still have to pay taxes on your debts. A lot of people don’t realize that even if their debts are discharged in the bankruptcy, they are still responsible to the IRS. The IRS usually does not allow complete forgiveness, although payment plans are common. Make sure to find out what is covered and what is not.

An important tip regarding personal bankruptcy is, gaining an understanding of what sorts of debts can, and cannot be included in a discharge. By realizing that some obligations are not considered dischargeable under the bankruptcy code, it is possible to make a wiser, more informed choice when it comes to making the decision to file a petition.

Seek advice from a debt consultant before you file for bankruptcy. Deciding to file for bankruptcy is not something that you should do without first seeking advice from a financial expert. This is because filing for bankruptcy will seriously hinder your ability to secure credit in the coming years.

Ask friends and family for moral support. They may not be able to lend you money, but you should be able to tell them about your hardships and to lean on them. It can be hard to talk about money with the people close to you. You will likely find that they are much more supportive than you expect.

Before you consider filing for bankruptcy, you should make a pre-determination if bankruptcy may be the right choice. First, make a list of all income, including, salary, child support, alimony, rent and any other sources you may have. Then, make a list of your bills. These would include mortgage, rent, car payments, monthly credit card payments, groceries and gas. If your monthly bill total is more than the income you bring in, it may be time to seek the advice of a bankruptcy attorney, who can help you make the final decision.

Now that you know some of the facts regarding personal bankruptcy, you should have a better idea if it is the best financial move to make. Carefully consider the amount of debt-to-income that you have. Use the calculation, as well as, how many late payments you face each month, as a guide to decide.